cholesterol
CHOLESTEROL CONTROL

The body uses cholesterol to produce hormones, vitamin D, and the bile acids that help to digest fat. We need only a small amount of cholesterol in the blood to meet these needs, and if we have too much cholesterol in the bloodstream, the excess may be deposited in arteries, including the coronary arteries of the heart, and the carotid arteries to the brain. High level of cholesterol in the blood stream is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, heart attack and stroke.

 

 

CHOLESTEROL CONTROL GUIDE

In both alternative and conventional treatment of high cholesterol, the first-line treatment options are exercise, diet, weight loss, stopping smoking and supplements that help optimize cholesterol levels. If you're looking for an all-natural way to lower your cholesterol there are plenty of dietary supplements on the market that can help to do the trick. Here's a list of the top supplement types people should use to produce the best results:

 

HEALTHY FATS

Specific fats play a critical role in the proper functioning of cardiovascular system, and healthy cholesterol metabolism. Studies fonud that omega-3 fatty acids and CLA, can help aid in healthy levels of LDL and HDL cholesterol.

FIBER SUPPLEMENTS

Evidence suggests that soluble fiber is effective cholesterol lowering nutrients, but both types of fiber are important for your health. Soluble fibers reduce cholesterol absorption in the intestines, and decrease the amount of bile reabsorbed in the intestines.

GUGGULSTERONES

Guggulsterones have been widely used in Asia as cholesterol-lowering herbs, and their popularity is rapidly increasing in the western world. Studies found that guggulsterones lower triglycerides, LDL and VLDL cholesterol levels, and raise levels of HDL cholesterol.

GREEN TEA

Studies of large populations have found that the more green tea that people drink the lower their total and LDL cholesterol levels. Studies showed that green tea decreases intestinal absorption of cholesterol by up to 89%,

SPIRULINA

In a variety of different studies, spirulina has been shown to improve blood cholesterol profiles. In a study thirty healthy men with high cholesterol, showed lower serum cholesterol, triglyceride and LDL cholesterol levels after eating spirulina for eight weeks.

L-CARNITINE

Clinical trials found that L-Carnitine supplementation can reduce serum total cholesterol and oxidized LDL cholesterol levels. In addition L-Carnitine supplementation may increase HDL cholesterol levels.

COENZYME Q10

Levels of Coenzyme Q10 tend to be lower in people with high cholesterol levels compared to healthy individuals. In addition, certain cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins deplete natural levels of Coenzyme Q10 in the body.

 

Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acids

Omega-3 fatty acids are essential fatty acids that can help aid in healthy levels of LDL and HDL cholesterol. Eskimos, who consume high amounts of omega-3 fatty acids, tend to have increased HDL cholesterol and decreased triglycerides. Studies have shown that getting enough DHA and EPA through diet or fish oil supplements protects against cardiovascular disease by lowering the levels of triglycerides in the blood, while raising levels of HDL ("good") cholesterol, and may also act as an anticoagulant to prevent blood from clotting.


Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA)

Several studies showed that CLA had beneficial effects on cholesterol metabolism. CLA may lower total serum cholesterol levels, lower LDL ("bad") cholesterol and lower triglyceride levels, while also increases the stability of cholesterol, causing it to become less susceptible to oxidation. CLA's antioxidant properties may play an important role in its ability to help keep the blood vessels clean.


Fiber Supplements

Evidence suggests that soluble fiber is effective cholesterol lowering nutrients, but both types of fiber are important for your health. Soluble fiber appears to reduce LDL cholesterol by reducing cholesterol absorption in the intestines; it binds with cholesterol so that it is excreted. In addition soluble fiber may lower blood cholesterol through its ability to decrease the amount of bile reabsorbed in the intestines. When fiber interferes with absorption of bile in the intestines, the bile is excreted. To make up for this loss of bile, the liver makes more bile salts. The body uses cholesterol to make bile salts. Research has shown that increasing soluble fiber by 5 to 10 g a day reduces LDL cholesterol by about five percent. The FDA allows soluble fiber products to indicate on the label that they are "heart-healthy".

Guggulsterones

Guggulsterones have been widely used in Asia as cholesterol-lowering herbs, and their popularity is rapidly increasing in the western world. Studies show that guggulsterones lower triglycerides, LDL and VLDL ("bad") cholesterol levels, and at the same time, it raises levels of HDL ("good") cholesterol. Guggulsterones, have been shown to be potent antagonists of 2 nuclear hormone receptors involved in cholesterol metabolism, and work by blocking a substance that stops the body from getting rid of cholesterol.

In a placebo controlled study guggulsterone supplementation for 12 weeks significantly lower serum cholesterol (24% average) and serum triglyceride (23% average) levels in 80% of patients.


Green Tea

Studies of large populations have found that the more green tea that people drink the lower their total and LDL cholesterol levels. Studies showed that green tea decreases intestinal absorption of cholesterol by up to 89%, while increasing its rate of excretion. But even more important than whisking away excess cholesterol is green tea's ability to fight the conversion of LDL to its more dangerous, oxidized form.

According to a placebo controlled study green tea lowers total cholesterol by 11% for people with high cholesterol and reduces LDL ("bad") cholesterol levels up to 16%. In addition the antioxidant substances found in green tea help prevents damage that creates bad cholesterol. EGCG from green tea prevents 73% of new blockages from LDL ("bad") cholesterol.


Spirulina

In a variety of different human and animal studies, spirulina has been shown to improve blood cholesterol profiles, boost immunity, and control blood sugars. In a study thirty healthy men with high cholesterol, mild hypertension and hyperlipidemia showed lower serum cholesterol, triglyceride and LDL („bad") cholesterol levels after eating spirulina for eight weeks. In another study a group of men with high cholesterol took 4.2 grams per day of spirulina, and experienced a 4.5% decrease in cholesterol after one month.


L-Carnitine/Acetyl L-Carnitine

Carnitine is needed by muscles including the heart muscle to utilize fat for energy. Improved lipid transport facilitate weight management, increase exercise performance and balance cholesterol levels. Studies report that administration of l-carnitine reduces serum total cholesterol and oxidized LDL cholesterol levels, in addition carnitine supplementation may increase HDL cholesterol levels.


Coenzyme Q10

Levels of Coenzyme Q10 tend to be lower in people with high cholesterol levels compared to healthy individuals. In addition, certain cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins deplete natural levels of Coenzyme Q10 in the body. Coenzyme Q10 is a powerful antioxidant that has been shown to be beneficial for heart health by protecting LDL cholesterol from oxidation and by re-energizing the mitochondria in the heart cells. In addition Coenzyme Q10 has been shown to regenerate vitamin E and break off its tendency to promote LDL oxidation.

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